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Even with all our gadgets, Americans are using less electricity than 10 years ago

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Electronic devices are getting smaller and more energy-efficient.

Everything from our heating systems to our toothbrushes are plugged in and connected to internet, and smartphones are glued to the palms of our hands. Yet, Americans are using less electricity than we did 10 years ago.

Overall residential electricity sales have declined 3 percent from 2010 to 2016, and 7 percent on a per capita basis, according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Annual and U.S. Census Bureau Population estimates.

Our numerous gadgets are all getting more efficient, so they’re less of a drain on residential electric bills.

And our devices are also getting smaller.

Most TVs are now flat and require less energy to operate than the giant TVs of yore. TVs in general are also disappearing from American households, as Americans spend less time watching TV.

Instead, we spend more time online, increasingly on laptops and tablets (rather than bigger and less-efficient PCs). Most importantly, we’re spending more of our time on relatively tiny and energy-efficient smartphones.

Eventually, however, the ubiquity of rechargeable devices will counter efficiency gains, causing a net electricity consumption increase from 2030 to 2040, according to the EIA.

Also, much of our personal computing is being offloaded to the cloud — i.e. servers in data centers somewhere else. This electricity consumption — carried by the Facebooks, Googles and Amazons of the world, among other companies — is considered commercial electricity usage. There, too, we’re seeing efficiency gains, but our data demands will grow ever larger over the next 20 years.

So, while declines are expected to continue into the near future, the increased adoption and saturation of all types of electronic devices will eventually weigh on electricity consumption in both the residential and, more dramatically, the commercial sectors.

 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration
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yatesa01
12 days ago
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Interesting article. What the author doesn't discuss is the transition to more energy efficient lighting that is taking place during this same time period. It would be interesting to know how much of the decrease can be attributed to that one change alone.
Andover, CT
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kleer001
27 days ago
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On open letter to the pet sitter that we probably won’t send because we’re not monsters and also we don’t want her to run away.

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Next week we’re going on a road trip from Washington to Colorado so we hired a pet-sitter to watch the cats and Lizard Bordan and keep us from being robbed but we weren’t sure if we’d be able to meet … Continue reading



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yatesa01
27 days ago
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Andover, CT
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